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Stock speculator vs stock investor



Stock speculator vs stock investor

Stock speculators are often ambiguously categorized as stock traders, if trading in that capacity, as it sounds more acceptable to the general public. Individuals or firms trading equity (stock) on the stock markets as their principal capacity are often called stock traders. Stock speculators usually try to profit from short-term price volatility with trades lasting anywhere from several seconds to several weeks.

The stock speculator is usually a professional. Persons can call themselves full or part-time stock traders/investors while maintaining other professions. When a stock speculator/investor has clients, and acts as a money manager or adviser with the intention of adding value to their clients finances, he is also called a financial advisor or manager. In this case, the financial manager could be an independent professional or a large bank corporation employee. This may include managers dealing with investment funds, hedge funds, mutual funds, and pension funds, or other professionals in venture capital, equity investment, fund management, and wealth management. These organized investors, are sometimes referred to as institutional investors. Several different types of stock trading strategies or approaches exist including day trading, trend following, market making, scalping (trading), momentum trading, trading the news, and arbitrage.


On the other hand, stock investors are firms or individuals who purchase stocks with the intention of holding them for an extended period of time, usually several months to years, for passive income objectives such as dividend accumulation. They rely primarily on fundamental analysis for their investment decisions and fully recognize stock shares as part-ownership in the company. Many investors believe in the buy and hold strategy, which as the name suggests, implies that investors will buy stock ownership in a corporation and hold onto those stocks for the very long term, generally measured in years.